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Upcoming Events

Northern Nevada Advocacy Retreat, Reno

Wednesday, September 23rd
9am to 3pm
United Way, 639 Isbell Rd, Reno, NV

This Retreat is for new, experienced and prospective advocacy volunteers who would like to learn more about our state and national policy priorities, our volunteer advocacy program, and ways to engage Nevada's elected legislators in the movement to find a cure and improve care and support for people living with Alzheimer's disease.  

Please RSVP to Jessica Rothhaar at or 775-786-8061

John Funderburk, the Association's National Director of Advocacy and Finance Director of our sister organization, the Alzheimer's Impact Movement, will be our special guest speaker. John will give us the latest advocacy news from Washington, DC and also talk about ways ordinary Nevadans can engage the 2016 Presidential candidates in talking about Alzheimer's.

A continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Volunteer to Help End Alzheimer's

By becoming an advocacy volunteer, you can play a vital role in our efforts to strengthen federal, state and local policy makers’ commitment to end this devastating disease. 

Alzheimer’s Congressional Teams
 and Ambassadors are grassroots volunteers who serve as the Association’s primary messengers for their member of Congress. They work directly with our staff to build relationships with their Member of Congress through personal contacts, meetings and other activities. 

Things Congressional Team members do include:Meet With Legislator
Meet and talk with their legislators
- Write letters to the editor of their local newspaper
- Attend and ask questions at local town hall meetings or other community events
- Attend our annual Alzheimer's Advocacy Day in their State Capitol
- Attend our National Advocacy Forum in Washington D.C.

Solano ProclamationWe ask volunteers for a 1 year commitment, and to plan on spending about 5 hours on advocacy. We train, support and work with you to help you be a great Advocacy Volunteer! We also encourage those with the disease to participate. Individuals in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease are among our most powerful, influential advocates. A person who is living with Alzheimer's and chooses to raise their voice against the disease not only sends a powerful message to legislators at the state and federal level, but helps remove stigma and negative assumptions associated with Alzheimer's disease.See what some of our advocates have to say about why they get involved:

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Sign Up!


There are a few ways you can get involved with us. Here’s how: 

  1. Sign up to receive e-mail updates on all things Alzheimer’s Advocacy related. Click here.

  2. Attend the next quarterly Policy Committee Meeting in your region. If you are interested, please contact Jessica Rothhaar at or 408-372-9936
  3. Join your local Alzheimer’s Congressional Team (ACT). Fill out the application here.

What We’re Working On

Federal Policy

Purple capitolAlzheimer’s is the most expensive disease in America, with costs set to skyrocket in the years ahead. Our Trajectory Report shows how a treatment by 2025 saves lives and dollars. For Medicare and Medicaid, treatments equal savings. In 2015 the total cost of Alzheimer’s will be $226 billion, including $150 billion to Medicare and Medicaid. Meanwhile, only 0.25% of this total has been committed to Alzheimer’s research, the only path to reducing this cost. The most recent facts and figures on the disease can be found here and the most recent facts on funding can be found here.

>> Find out who represents you in Congress

Our 2015 Federal Priorities:

             (Has your Member of Congress cosponsored the HOPE Act, view the list of current co-sponsors in the House and Senate)

State Policy

Advocacy Volunteers receive California Assembly Resolution ACR80 from Assemblymen
James Gallagher (R - Nicolaus) & Bill Quirk (D - Hayward) 

To achieve meaningful progress, states must tackle Alzheimer's not only as an aging issue, but also as a public health crisis. Alzheimer's disease is a pivotal public health battle,and state governments stand on the front line. The Alzheimer's Association calls on state policymakers to take bold action to confront this epidemic, focusing on four key priorities:

- Develop and implement a comprehensive state Alzheimer's disease plan
- Adopt uniform adult guardianship legislation
- Improve dementia training
- Collect data on the prevalence of Alzheimer's 


  • Find out who represents you in the California Legislature
  • Data on Alzheimer's in California: statewide
  • California’s five Alzheimer’s Association chapters work together to advance statewide public policy goals through the California Council.
  • 2015 State Policy Platform
  • State Plan: In 2011, the Alzheimer’s Association and California Department of Health and Human Services released the California State Plan for Alzheimer’s Disease, which includes recommendations to California policymakers to help California prepare for the coming Alzheimer’s epidemic and improve conditions for people with the disease and their families. The components of the State Plan are continuously reviewed by the California Council, and our California legislative priorities are guided by the plan’s key recommendations.
  • Coordinated Care Initiative or Cal MediConnect: We are working closely with the California Health and Human Services Agency to ensure that all managed care plans in all 6 participating counties in Cal MediConnect have at least one care coordination staff trained in dementia care management.      


Facts and Figures

Data on Alzheimer's in your state and county

You can also estimate the number of people in your county with Alzheimer's by using the 2010 US Census data on the number of people in your county 65+. Start by selecting your state on the map, then select your county at the top left, then click Browse Data Sets at the top right, then select Demographic Profile. Scroll down to see the total number of residents 65+. Coupled with the fact that 1 in 9 Americans 65+ has Alzheimer’s, this will give you a rough estimate of the number of people with the disease in your county. There is also My Congressional District, which gives you access to view statistics covering age, employment, education, and much more.