Blood test may help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease before start of symptoms
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March 12, 2014
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Blood test may help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease before start of symptoms
Researchers say a blood test may make it possible to predict who might get Alzheimer’s disease years before the start of symptoms. The study identified levels of 10 fats seen in the blood of people who went on to develop Alzheimer's two to three years later, and the test was accurate about 90 percent of the time. The results, while intriguing, are preliminary, and the test needs to be more widely studied before it can be used outside of clinical trials.

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Deaths from Alzheimer's may rank with cancer, heart disease
Deaths attributable to Alzheimer’s disease may top half a million a year, a figure that would put Alzheimer's just below heart disease and cancer, new research shows. An estimated 83,000 people in the United States died with Alzheimer’s in 2010, according to death certificates, making it the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death. The new study, where deaths were counted in a sample population and then multiplied by Census figures, suggests that the true total may be as much as six times higher.
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Alzheimer's Association awards largest-ever research grant
The Alzheimer's Association has awarded its largest-ever research grant — $8 million over four years — to support the Longitudinal Evaluation of Amyloid Risk and Neurodegeneration (LEARN) study. This research is a companion study to the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease (A4) Study, a pioneering Alzheimer's prevention trial that is starting this year.
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